0 comments on “The Black Hole”

The Black Hole

Disney’s film “The Black Hole” was their response to “Star Wars”. I can remember going to the cinema to see it, and the memory of it has always stayed with me. So much so that I found a copy of the film on eBay a few years ago and watched it again.

More recently I thought I’d get hold of a copy of the book, or rather, the novelisation of the film and try that. I finished reading it just the other day, and, on the whole, it is a fairly true reflection of the film itself. However, just as in the film, the ending, leaves quite a lot to be desired.

But the most confusing thing was the ending. The end sequence of the film seems to suggest that there is somewhere inside the black hole, and that’s where Dr Reinhardt and his evil robot Maximilian appear to be merged. It pretty much looks like hell though. The ending also seems to suggest that the crew of the Palomino make it through the black hole (can you go through a black hole?) and come out the other side.

One of the things that was a bit odd about the story were several references to how much things cost. This was in the film and the book. On a series of occasions characters referred to how much the Cygnus (the huge spaceship in the picture above) cost the tax payer. I felt that this was a bit strange and kind of out of place.

Although the book suggests that they have some kind of merged consciousness by the time they come through it.

All parts of this ending are pretty much unsatisfactory though. Even as a kid I wasn’t happy with this, and I’m still not happy with it. I felt like it required something more in terms of an outcome that could be comprehended. Of course, there will never be a remake now, or at least that’s very unlikely I would think. Depending on which source you check the remake was being considered in 2006 or 2009, but by 2016 was ruled out.

It’s a shame, it’s a missed opportunity I think, but never mind. The music was awesome.

Robots and not-so robots of The Black Hole
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0 comments on “Honk, Conk and Squacket”

Honk, Conk and Squacket

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I’ve been reading this book very slowly, mainly because it is in many ways just a dictionary, albeit a fantastic dictionary. Honk is a dictionary of ‘sound-words’, which is now something of a forgotten art. What need to we have any more of describing a sound when we can just hear it online somewhere within seconds.

Sound-words are fantastic though, they’re fantastical awesome constructions to help you imagine a sound.

The book brings together words from around the UK and the world for that matter. The words come from all ages too. So, if you enjoy sounds and have an interest in words too, this book may well be for you. I can safely say that I thoroughly enjoyed it.

0 comments on “The Edinburgh Festival”

The Edinburgh Festival

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Once again I visited the Edinburgh Fringe this year. It was, as always, great fun, with some truly excellent shows, and of course, some really quite terrible ones too. But overall it was great.

There were a few shows that stuck out, but only a few. But that’s kind of what matters at the fringe. You find a few things that make you sit up and think, and the rest, whilst fun, is just a part of the trip.

One thing that stood out was a production about Delia Derbyshire, which I quite enjoyed, but I actually knew a lot of the content was before I went to it. It was good to see a show about her anyway, and it was good to see people talking about her work.

0 comments on “A bit more about using Kastle synths live”

A bit more about using Kastle synths live

I thought I’d post a little more about the set up for the gig I played at Cafe Oto earlier in the week. I thought it might be useful or interesting to see the devices I used.

Originally, when Robyn asked me to do this, I thought I would use these plus an Olegtron 4060 (MK I). In the end the Olegtron was too complex and difficult to change patches with any speed.

So ended up with the 2 Kastle synths, a 1.0 and a 1.5. Actually the mix of the two is really good and works very well. Patching across the two devices makes for some very interesting possibilities.

What I’ve realised is that I really need a simpler way to load patches. Not physically of course, but a way to record patches. I thought that taking pictures would help, and it did, but it wasn’t the easiest way to recreate a patch. My next thoughts were to write down the patched information. That was my solution for the Cafe Oto gig, and it worked ok. But only ok.

So now I think I’m going to have to create my own patch sheets for the Kastle 1.0/1.5, and, when I do, I will post some templates here.

0 comments on “Robyn’s Rocket at Cafe Oto”

Robyn’s Rocket at Cafe Oto

On Wednesday I had the rare privilege of playing live at Cafe Oto with the amazingly talented Robyn. She is a gifted trumpet player and had a whole night of acts at Cafe Oto. I’ve been there many times and seen some amazing artists, so to play there myself was incredible.

It was a really great night too. Robyn was, of course, amazing. My small part was to bring some improvised electronics in the form of a couple of Bastl Instruments Kastle synths. To be precise a 1.0 and a new 1.5 Kastle. These little synths are amazing and incredibly versatile. There’s so much you can do with them.

Hopefully I’ll be able to get some of the footage and sound from the gig. When I do, I’ll be sharing that.

0 comments on “Spending some time at the Art Gallery of Ontario”

Spending some time at the Art Gallery of Ontario

This is a beautiful place. I was only in Toronto for a few days but this was on the top of my list of my places to go. My visit was back in July and it was really hot and humid, which was another great reason to go to the gallery as it has great air con!

I wasn’t really interested in the European art there, and much keener to see that First Nation art on show. I wasn’t disappointed. There are some stunning pieces there, and the volunteer guide who showed a group of us around was very good and had a lot of information on hand.

The Rebecca Belmore exhibition was stunning, and at times, disturbing. Whilst I can’t say that I enjoyed all of her work, I can say that it gave me more insight into First Nation issues.